Frugal Innovieren, aber wie? Methoden-Workshop am 9.11. in Hamburg

Methoden-Workshop zur Realisierung von frugalen Produkten und Geschäftsmodellen am 9. November 2017

SG-GroupMit weniger mehr erreichen – nicht weniger versprechen frugale Innovationen. Aber wie? Frugale Innovationen stehen für Produkte und Dienstleistungen, die eine erhebliche Kostenreduktion, eine Begrenzung auf die wichtigsten Funktionen und ein optimiertes Leistungsniveau im jeweiligen Kontext ermöglichen. Um in Schwellenländern wie Indien und China langfristig Erfolg zu haben, sind frugale Innovationen im Unternehmensportfolio zunehmend unverzichtbar. Frugale Innovationen können jedoch nicht nur in Schwellenländern, sondern auch in Industrienationen bedeutendes Absatzpotenzial freilegen, wie unsere Studienergebnisse zeigen.

Continue reading

Course on „Product Planning and Design for Frugal Innovations“ at Santa Clara University

Prof. Herstatt teaching a SCU

Prof. Herstatt teaching a SCU

Taking the collaboration between Center for Frugal Innovation (CFI) and the Frugal Innovation Hub at Santa Clara University (SCU) to next level, we have developed a new course on „Product Planning and Design for Frugal Innovations“ which is being offered currently to graduate students of the School of Engineering at SCU. The course has been developed by Prof. Dr. Cornelius Herstatt and Dr. Rajnish Tiwari and covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. It is based on a five phase stage-gate process model which integrates all major tasks that need to be paid attention to while creating new products and services. Continue reading

Investigating Frugality and Innovation in Japan

TUHH and TokyoTech collaborate with support of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) to investigate relevance of frugal innovations in the context of Japan

Group photo (L2R): R. Tiwari, M. Tsujimoto and C. Herstatt

Group photo (L2R): R. Tiwari, M. Tsujimoto and C. Herstatt at TokyoTech (Tamachi Campus)

The Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) via its Center for Frugal Innovation at the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech) via its Department of Technology and Innovation Management at School of Environment and Society (Tamachi Campus), have decided to join hands to conduct joint research to investigate the phenomenon of frugal innovation in the Japanese context. At first, a preliminary research is being conducted with support from JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) to generate initial impressions and take stock of the status-quo of frugal innovations in Japan. A mid-term objective is to conduct comparative studies between Germany and Japan with the objective of enabling mutual learnings. Continue reading

„Frugal Innovation in Scholarly and Social Discourse“: New Paper on Trends and Societal Implications

Tiwari_et_al_2016_Frugal_Innovation_BMBF_ITA_CoverAs a part of our joint BMBF-ITA project with Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy (MOEZ) in Leipzig we have published a new paper to assess trends and potential societal implications of frugal innovation by analyszing scholarly and social discourse.Apart from this the paper also reports results of our workshop held in Hamburg on January 12, 2016 to assess the potentials of frugal innovation in the specific context of Germany. The publication details are as follows:

Frugal Innovation in Scholarly and Social Discourse: An Assessment of Trends and Potential Societal Implications

Authored by: Rajnish Tiwari a, Luise Fischer b and Katharina Kalogerakis a

a Center for Frugal Innovation, Institute for Technology and Innovation Management, Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH), Hamburg, Germany

b Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy (MOEZ), Leipzig, Germany

Abstract

The topic of frugal innovation is increasingly gaining relevance in social as well as scholarly discourse. Frugal innovations have been perceived by many to be a phenomenon generally confined to emerging economies where there are large groups of unserved consumers with unmet needs. But there is increasing evidence that this phenomenon is getting relevant also in the industrialized nations potentially affecting the long-term competitiveness of domestic firms not only overseas but also at home.

Continue reading

A case of frugal organizational innovation in governance!?

By: Rajnish Tiwari

Just noticed an interesting news item from India in The Economic Times of Oct. 22, 2014. The government has decided to put all replies to queries filed under the „Right to Information“ (RTI) act online so that not only the person/organization having filed the query receives the information, but any interested person worldwide.

According to the report:

„Starting next month [i.e. Novemebr 2014], all replies given under RTI by ministries will be posted online, available for access to all and not just to persons seeking the information. This will mean unprecedented scale of disclosure and cheer transparency advocates […]. Until now, only the person filing the RTI application seeking replies from a ministry or a government department would get the reply and that too mostly via post.“

I imgaine that this move could be proably seen as a frugal innovation – an organizational innovation in the sense of the OECD/Eurostat definition of what an innovation is. By employing a high-tech/Internet-based solution the govt. can combat corruption while being able to dissemniate relevant information of public interest worldwide for almost no additional costs.

Read the complete news report: „Narendra Modi government takes RTI to another level: All replies to be put online“ (Oct. 22, 2014), accessed: Nov. 2, 2014.